Closing Temporarily!

Posted on | February 24, 2011 | No Comments

Hey folks,

I wanted everyone to know that we have decided to pare back the farm for a while due to unforeseen circumstances.

We plan on ramping up the All Natural Grass Fed & Finished Beef (and possibly Lamb)operation soon.   We will not be producing anymore Pastured Chicken.

We are in the process of upgrading the infrastructure of the farm to make it better suited for raising grassfed cattle, i.e. fencing, paddocks, irrigation, etc.

I will send an email update (to those who are on our list) letting everyone know when we are ready to take orders again.

It has been a real pleasure and joy to grow you “food fit to eat” and we look forward to doing it again soon.

Blessings,

mark

Grassfed & Pasture Finished Beef for Sale

Posted on | September 14, 2010 | 1 Comment

If you are looking for locally grown grassfed beef in the Augusta, GA; Aiken, SC; North Augusta, SC and the Lexington, SC area, you’ve come to the right place.

Thank you for your interest.  We look forward to growing you “food fit to eat.”

Please take a look at the information below.   If you would like to order, please go to the contact page and email me your order.  I will contact you for details.

Grassfed & Pasture Finished Angus Beef

We are taking orders for sides and half-sides (quarters) of beef.  We will processing a few by the end of July, a few more in August and a few more in September. If you are interested please let me know soon.

Many of our repeat customers buy their beef by the Half-Side. We could also say that a Half-Side is really a Quarter.  The cuts in a Half-Side are exactly half the identical cuts in a Whole-Side.  Half-Sides are priced at $6.25 per pound. Half-Sides contain 70-90 pounds of kitchen-ready cuts that have been deboned as much as possible, frozen and vacuum sealed for unlimited freezer storage time.  Per capita consumption of beef in the USA is approximately 62 pounds. Therefore, a Half-Side will be a 6 – 9 month supply of beef for a family of two.

Buying Whole Sides make sense for the least per-pound-cost for your beef.  Our Sides are priced at $6.00 per pound and contain 150-180 pounds of cuts.  Our passion is to produce wholesome family beef.  We direct-market “from our farm to your family”.  We prefer selling to families, large or small because we are Legacy “Family” Farm and we know the importance of families.  For smaller families, we recommend joining with friends and still buying by the Whole Side to save the most money.  It is not difficult to divide a Beef Side cut by cut, 50/50.

No Need to Give Up Marbling

When you order Legacy Family Farm Beef, you can be assured of high quality flavor and tender well-marbled meat.  All our beeves are young 100% Angus cattle, that are bred for high carcass quality and excellent marbling characteristics.  Our beef is Dry aged for 14-21 days, which further enhances the flavor and naturally tenderizes the beef.  Meat with little or no marbling will have very little flavor and usually not be as tender.  We achieve the desired marbling with intensive rotational grazing that assures the beeves are always eating the “cream of the crop” highly nutritious salad bar we have for them in our pastures.

Our beeves are finished on 100% natural vegetarian grass, forbs and legumes, naturally grown and grazed by the cattle at their leisure.  We use bulls with genetic characteristics to naturally enhance the desirable features of our herd for grass finishing – small framed and wide.  Our cattle are not crossbred but purebred Angus. They are good mothers, good-natured, highly adaptable, early maturing cattle.

Because of the excellent marbling quality of our beef, you should not need to adapt or change your recipes or cooking methods to accommodate our grass fed beef.  Although our beef is lean in nature, its fat composition tends to be well distributed throughout the muscle lending itself to intense flavor and a superior culinary experience.

Custom Processing

After our beef is dry aged, it is cut to your specifications, packed in airtight vacuum-sealed plastic and flash frozen.

We recommend that you request steaks to be cut no less than 1″ thick, the filets even thicker.  Roasts can be ordered anywhere from 2 to 5 pounds or even more depending on your family’s needs.  Below is an example chart of what cuts you might expect to get when you order a side of beef, twice this for a whole and half for a split side (quarter). We do not sell front or hind-quarters but rather “split sides”.  This way both customers receive an equal half of the chuck, the round, etc. If you are wanting a quarter only, you may want to order a side and split it with a friend.  If you have special requests for cuts, please let us know, otherwise you will receive a “standard” split side order with half the tenderloin, half the rib cuts, etc. When ordering a side, you can order the loin to be cut into filet steaks or a tenderloin roast but not both.  The round can be ground for ground beef or cut into stew meat or roasts.

Needed Freezer Space

You will need at least 5-6 cubic feet of freezer space for a side of beef (2-3 cubic feet for a half-side).  One cubic ft (12″x 12″ …think milk crate) of freezer space will hold about 30lbs of frozen beef.  The average kitchen freezer compartment is too small to accommodate a side of beef, but you might squeeze a quarter of beef in there, though there wouldn’t be much room for ice cream.

Our beef will keep in the freezer easily for six months to one year.  The meat is flash frozen and vacuum sealed in heavy plastic and well protected.  We have never experienced any freezer “burn” with this packaging.

Below is an example of how many and which cuts of meat you will get in a side of beef.  If you are interested in more information, check out the beef cuts chart by CLICKING HERE.



Lexington & Aiken Farmer’s Market

Posted on | June 15, 2010 | 1 Comment

Hey Folks,

Whew! Has it ever been this hot!  I think I say that every year, but good gracious!  Have you ever wondered why we don’t have a national holiday for Willis Haviland Carrier.  Some of you might not know who this is because he hasn’t been given his just due – He is the inventor of air conditioning. On days like today, I think we all should all give homage to him.  Hopefully we will get a break soon.

I wanted to let everyone know that we will be at the Lexington Farmer’s Market this Thursday (17th) from 10:00am to 2:00pm at the Shoppes At Flight Deck and we will be at the Aiken Farmer’s Market this Saturday (19th) from 8:00am to 12:00pm.

We have a fresh batch of pastured chicken and a few cuts of lamb left.

You can click on the Price List page to see what’s available.

For your convenience, and ours, feel free to take a look at what we have available and reply back to me with an order with the location you would like it delivered to.  We will bring your order when we come. You can email by clicking on the Contact Us page and my email address.

Remember – we are taking orders for our Grass Fed & Pasture Finished Beef – we will have a few ready by the end of July, a few by the end of August and a few more in September.  Take a look at the website for more information.

I look forward to seeing you at the market.

Blessings,

mark


Our Upcoming Schedule & Ordering Information

Posted on | May 6, 2010 | 4 Comments

Hey Folks,

I wanted to let everyone know what our schedule will be the next few weeks. Again, thank you for all your support.

We did not attend any markets last week and again, we will not attend any this week – I did not anticipate the demand and as you know we are sold out.

Our Schedule:

We will attend the Aiken Farmer’s Market this Saturday, May 15th from 8:00am to 12:00pm.  Look forward to seeing you there.

Thursday, May 20th – Lexington Farmer’s Market – Lexington, SC – Shoppes at Flight Deck

Saturday, May 22nd – Aiken Farmer’s Market – Aiken, SC – Williamsburg St between Park and Richland Avenues

As long as we have product (and we have fulfilled all the requirements of the Georgia government red tape) we will attend the Augusta Market on the River every 1st and 3rd Saturday, the Aiken Farmer’s Market every 2nd and 4th Saturday, and the Lexington Market every 1st and 3rd Thursday.

Pastured Chicken:

We will be processing another batch of Pastured Chicken next Monday May 10th, so we should be stocked up for at least three weeks, with another batch ready June 7th. We are ramping up production as demand increases not only from great folks like you at the farmer’s markets, but also stores and some restaurants – we are grateful. If you would like to order, please reply with an email at mark@legacyfamilyfarm.com .

Grassfed & Pastured Finished Beef:

We are just about sold out of beef. We have a few roasts  and other cuts left, but not much.  We are working to have some more finished by this late summer – Pasture finishing takes time. I will let you know when we have some for sale. If you are interested in a side or a half side of beef – please let me know.

Many of our repeat customers buy their beef by the Half-Side. We could also say that a Half-Side is really a Quarter.The cuts in a Half-Side are exactly half the identical cuts in a Whole-Side. Half-Sides are priced at $630 which is $5.25 per pound. Half-Sides contain 120 pounds of kitchen-ready cuts that have been deboned as much as possible, frozen and vacuum sealed for unlimited freezer storage time. Per capita consumption of beef in the USA is approximately 62 pounds. Therefore, a Half-Side will be a one-year supply of beef for a family of two.

Buying Whole Sides make sense for the least per-pound-cost for your beef. Our Sides are prices at $1200.00 Which is $5.00 per pound. Our passion is to produce wholesome family beef. We direct- market “from our farm to your family”. We prefer selling to families, large or small because we are Legacy “Family” Farm and we know the importance of families. For smaller families, we recommend joining with friends and still buying by the Whole Side to save the most money. It is not difficult to divide a Beef Side cut by cut, 50/50.

Grassfed & Pasture Finished Lamb:

We are sold out of all our fall lambs from last year. As we grow our flock we have decided to keep all the ewe lambs for breeding and process the ram lambs. This last lambing time, we had five ewes and five rams born- we keep the ewes and one ram for a future stud – that leaves us with four rams.  We are processing the rams next week.  Obviously, four rams will not go far and we are selling them by the half (15-20 lbs) for $160 and by the whole (30-40 lbs) $300.  If you would like to order a half or whole, please let me know. I can have it custom butchered for your specific needs.

PLEASE SEND ORDERS VIA EMAIL TO mark@legacyfamilyfarm.com .

Blessings,

mark

Growing Food Locally & Humanely for Our Community


Thank You for Your Support!

Posted on | April 25, 2010 | No Comments

Hey Folks,
I wanted to thank everyone for a very encouraging first week back last week. We had a great time at the Lexington Farmer’s Market, the Brickyard Market at Hammond’s Ferry and the Aiken Farmer’s Market. It went so well that we are already sold out of a few things and getting low on others. We are very low on lamb, getting low on beef and are out of most chicken pieces – we do have whole chicken. We will be processing more lamb in May and I will have a new batch of chickens processed the first week of May.

As always, if you would like to place an order and pick up at one of the markets we attend or at the farm, please look at the Price List page to check availability.

I apologize for the number of items we are out of at the moment – the demand for our chicken has been overwhelming and I’m doing everything I can to ramp up production so anybody that wants a chicken “fit to eat” for their family, can have one. The same goes for the lamb – trying to grow the flock – keeping all the ewe lambs to be brood ewes and just processing the rams – it results in a lack of supply for now, but in the long run we should have enough to suffice. We are working on a solution for the beef also.

Thank you for your patience and your support. Obviously we couldn’t do this without your help. Thank you for allowing us to grow you great tasting healthy food and for helping make our dream of farming become a reality. We are very grateful.

Blessings,
mark

Worming the Sheep

Posted on | April 25, 2010 | 1 Comment

This is a video of a few of us worming the sheep. For those of you who are not familiar with this area – hot, humid, sandy loam soil – you would not know that it is virtually impossible to raise sheep without worming at least a couple times a year. My goal is to worm as little as possible and to breed a resistance to worms into the flock over a period of time – I tried to do that a little to quickly last year and lost a few. After speaking with some old timers in the area, I realize that it’s tough to raise sheep without periodic worming anywhere in the world, but especially in these parts. I do mix in diatomaceous earth into the alfalfa pellets periodically – they say this will decrease worm problems because as it moves through the sheep’s digestive system, it slices and dices the worms! I’m not sure, but I’m trying it. The sheep you see are Katahdin and Katahdin / Dorper crosses. They are meat sheep or sometimes called hair sheep. They really don’t produce any usable wool and they are better suited for hotter climates. They are great lambers, mothers and hearty. By the way, we will be processing four rams next month – if your interested, please let m know.

Moving Chicks from the Brooder to the Pasture

Posted on | April 25, 2010 | 2 Comments

Folks, this video is for those who would like to see how we move the chicks from the brooder to the pasture. You’ll a get a pretty good look at the brooder and the pasture pens / electric netting set up in the pasture.  I apologize for its length – it may bore you to death, but if you’re interested – here it is…

We are Busy at Legacy – Thank You!!!

Posted on | April 19, 2010 | No Comments

It’s been a while since I have updated our website but I did want to let you know what all has been happening with Legacy Family Farm. Since my last update we’ve processed 120 broilers, put 148 out on the pasture, and ordered 200 more to be delivered this Friday. We were offered a booth at the Yellow Jessamine Festival in downtown North Augusta back on March 27th, where we were able to offer our pastured chicken, grassfed lamb and grassfed beef, meet a bunch of folks and enjoy some good food and music. This last week was a very busy week – Thursday at Lexington Farmer’s Market, Friday at the Brickyard Market at Hammond’s Ferry in North Augusta, and Saturday at the Aiken Farmer’s Market. We had a great time at all the markets and the interest in our products was very encouraging. As a matter of fact, we had our best day ever at the Aiken Farmer’s Market this last Saturday.  We are so thankful and appreciative to all those who continue to support our farm and we look forward to growing more and more folks “food fit to eat.”

YellowJessaminePhoto

LexingtonFarmersmarketphoto

This Friday the 23rd we will be at the Brickyard Market at Hammond’s Ferry, North Augusta from 6:00pm – 9:00pm and the Aiken Farmer’s Market on Saturday the 24th from 8:00am – 12:00pm. We will be attending the Lexington Farmer’ Market at the Shoppes at Flight Deck every 1st and 3rd Thursday of the month – the next time will be May 6th. If you would like to make an order, please email me  and let me know where you would like to pick it up. BEFORE YOU ORDER – PLEASE LOOK AT THE PRICE LIST PAGE ON THE WEBSITE TO SEE WHAT WE HAVE AVAILABLE.

We are taking orders for lamb. We are almost out of the fall lamb we processed and I will be processing four more in May. If you are interested in special cuts or half or whole, please let me know.

We are taking orders for pastured turkey to be ready by the first or second week of November. If you would like one for your Thanksgiving meal, please call or email to let me know.

Look forward to seeing y’all soon.

Blessings

Chickens in the Brooder – Two Weeks Later

Posted on | March 17, 2010 | 1 Comment

Here’s the video I promised on an earlier post showing how much the chicks have grown in two weeks. I also mention a few helpful hints for anyone interested in doing this themselves.

Farm Blooper – Farmer vs. Ram

Posted on | March 15, 2010 | 4 Comments

I thought it would be fun to share just one of the many “bloopers” we’ve had around here. If we had the video camera with us more often, we could probably fill up the blog with them. This is a video of me trying to flip our ram, Jerry, over on his back and sit him up on his rump to facilitate trimming his hooves – obviously he wasn’t interested. Sorry for the low quality video – we’re still learning how to do that to. By the way, the second time I tried it – I looked like a pro, but we didn’t capture that on video – imagine that!!

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About Legacy Family Farm

Legacy Family Farm is a local family farm in North Augusta, South Carolina, that believes in growing food the way God intended - naturally. Vegetables grown without synthetic fertilizers, harmful chemicals or pesticides. Animals raised on pastures with no hormones and no antibiotics.

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